Category Archives: Time Lapse Photography

Yosemite Time Lapse from Artist’s Point (Tunnel View)

Yosemite is one of the world’s most loved National Parks and no location in Yosemite is more famous than Tunnel View.   Ansel Adam’s photo from this spot (Clearing Winter Storm) was one of the iconic shots of the 20th century.  Not only is the view spectacular, you can easily drive right up to it on Wawona Road.   So it really isn’t surprising that this is the most popular and photographed location in the park.

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Tunnel View. One of the most recognized and incredible vistas anywhere.

But it wasn’t always so.  Until 1933 when the tunnel was opened, Tunnel View simply didn’t exist as we know it now.  For the previous 7 decades, Wawona Road had entered the valley via a different route that included the most famous spot in the park:  Artist’s Point.  This was the location where in June of 1855 the first image of the Yosemite Valley was drawn by a professional artist.  The artist was Thomas Ayres and when his picture was published in California Magazine it captivated and amazed the public, which helped spark the nation’s facination with Yosemite.   Later a stagecoach road was built to the valley that ran right by this spot and in the early 20th century it was even paved for the new-fangled horseless carriages.  When the tunnel was completed in the 1930s, Wawona Road was rerouted and the section that included Artist’s Point was abandoned.  Now, after 80+ years of neglect, it is nearly forgotten, crumbling and overgrown.

Earlier this year my son and I decided to hike to Artist’s Point.  We wanted to see if Ayres original location at Artist’s Point could compare with the awe inspiring scene at Tunnel View.  A quick (but steep) 40 minute hike was all it took to reach Artist’s Point and take in the view:

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Artist’s Point is at a higher elevation and a bit northeast of Tunnel View, so you do get a slightly different perspective of the valley.

Is it a better view?  Some folk swear up and down that it is.  Jump back and forth between the two photos above and make your own decision.  Personally, I thought the view from Artist’s Point was only subtly different from what you will see from Tunnel View.  But even though the view is similar, the experience is totally different.  Unlike Tunnel View where loud motorcyles, cars and buses disgorge throngs of noisy tourists every few moments, you will likely be the only soul at Artist’s Point.  The quiet and sense of peace is pervasive.  You get a feeling of what it must have been like when Thomas Ayres sat on a rock nearby all those years ago and sketched a pristine and untouched paradise.

Photography is my way of trying to share with you what my son and I experienced at Artist’s Point.  But a photograph shows only a moment of time and fails to capture the dramatic way the shadows move across the valley.  I thought a time lapse might be the best way to show this, so I set up one of my cameras to take a shot of the valley every 15 seconds or so during the couple hours Ryan and I there.

Yosemite Time Lapse from Artist's Point (Tunnel View)

Click anywhere on photo to see my timelapse:  “A Minute of Magic at Artist’s Point”

I call the resulting video “A Minute of Magic at Artist’s Point.”  It’s only a couple minutes long, but I think it truly conveys a sense of the tranquility and beauty this magnificent view inspires.  Just click on the photo to the right and it will take you to my video posted on You Tube (it was just too large for my website).

I hope you enjoy!

Jeff

 

PS:  This video was shot during March which is a great time of the year to watch sunsets because both sides of the valley are illuminated at the end of the day.  Plus, the sun shines thru a small opening in the mountains to the west creating the ‘spotlight’ effect on Bridalveil Falls you see in my photos.

 

 

Also posted in Yosemite Tagged , , , , |

Lost in Space: Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower at Lost Lake Oregon

Lost in Space:  Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower at Lost Lake Oregon

Yes, I am a child of the 60s!

Have you ever seen the excitement in a child’s face when she experiences something for the first time?  Seeing that joy and hearing those squeals of delight are one of the things I most love most about children.

As we get older, we tend to get jaded and take much of life for granted.  Those moments of childlike happiness become a rare thing.  Which is one of the reasons that I adore photography….it continually challenges me to seek out new locations and experiences and helps keep the child alive in me.

For, example, earlier this year my son Ryan and I were planning a trip to Oregon.  While talking with one of my friends in Portland, he mentioned that the Perseid meteor shower would be peaking when I was visiting.  Now honestly, I had vaguely heard of the Perseid’s before, but neither Ryan or I had ever even seen a meteor, much less photographed one.

But a quick search on Google educated me:  The annual Perseid meteor shower is probably the most popular one of the year.  When the Earth crosses the path of Comet Swift-Tuttle in late August, debris from the comet cuts thru our atmosphere at 130,000 miles per hour sometimes resulting in dozens of meteors per hour.

Well that certainly sounded like something I wanted to see!

But where in Oregon would be best to photograph this spectacle?  I wanted a spot with great views (of course) and little light pollution.  After some research on the internet, I decided to split my time between two locations in northern Oregon’s Cascade Mountain range: Trillium Lake and Lost Lake.

Well, we got to Trillium Lake on Aug 10th right after sunset.  And the sky was overcast.  Couldn’t see a single star.    Killed a couple hours eating dinner (and drinking great local beer) then went outside to check again.  Clouds.  Went to bed and got up two more times to check.  Clouds.  The sky did start to clear up just before sunrise so Ryan and I went down to Trillium and captured some shots, but by then it was too bright to see meteors.  Just the same, it was a quiet, peaceful sunrise.  Trillium Lake is an idyllic spot and it is easy to visualize how incredible photos can be taken here..

Lake Trillium Oregon Sunrise

Other than the kayaker and one very persistent duck, Ryan seemed to have the view to himself.

After a day exploring some incredible waterfalls in the Columbia River Gorge (another post about this adventure later) we pulled into Lost Lake late in the afternoon and set up camp in our Yurt.  What’s a yurt you ask?  Well, when you make reservations at a popular campground only a month in advance during peak season, a yurt is likely to be the only thing left available. Like I said, photography helps me have new experiences…

I had pre-scouted the area on Google Earth and knew I wanted to photograph the meteors from the north-western shore (Lost Lake is shaped like a triangle, and the northwestern shore faces Mt. Hood).  What I couldn’t see on my computer was that trees grow right up to the shore blocking your view of the sky, not exactly ideal for sky photography.  But there was one strip of shore, maybe 100′ long that was perfect: overhead it had a clear stretch of sky and below in the shallows of the lake were wonderful boulders and fallen trees that made great foreground subjects.

Except for one little problem…a group of folks were already there enjoying a bonfire.  So Ryan and I hiked up the shoreline vainly looking for a decent alternative location but we had no luck.  We returned to a spot near the original location and made the best of it, but the light from their fire played havoc on my shots.  Their party finally wrapped up by 11 pm and as their fire faded out, the views of the stars and meteors reflected on the calm lake became more visible.

Lost in Space:  Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower at Lost Lake Oregon

But my heart had been set on taking shots of Mt. Hood with the Milky Way behind it.  Unfortunately, by this late hour the rotation of the earth had moved the Milky Way so far to the west that I couldn’t fit it into the frame with Mt. Hood.  Plus I had hauled my not-so-young body around for miles that day and I was exhausted, so headed back to camp with hopes of better luck the following night.

The next morning, we went back to watch the dawn.  No wind, no clouds, (no bonfire!)…it was one of the most perfect scenes I could imagine.

Sunrise at Lost Lake Oregon Mt. Hood

After a few shots, we hit the road early to go hike more waterfalls but drove back to Lost Lake well before sunset to get ‘first dibs’ on our spot.   As the clearing came into view we were happy to see that we were the only ones there, so we set up our equipment, set back and relaxed while we waited for the show to start.

It turned out Ryan and weren’t the only photographers that knew about “our” perfect spot.  Over the next couple hours, four more shutterbugs (who had also previously scouted the area) set up next to us.  They knew that the peak of the meteor shower was going to be that night (Aug 12) and had all traveled to Lost Lake to capture images of it.

Actually, this is one of the things that Ryan and I like most about photography…meeting and getting to know other photographers.  Most of them love to talk about their hobby and share their knowledge and swap stories.  One of the guys, Dan Duerden, was a High School teacher from British Columbia who was spending his 3 month summer holiday on a photographic journey through the PAC NW.  Dan is an incredibly talented photographer and you can see more of his work on his Instagram page: https://instagram.com/dduerds/ .  Ryan had recently started posting his own photos on Instagram (https://instagram.com/ryanstamer/)  and the two of them had an animated conversation about that topic…it was all way over my head.

There was a retired guy obsessed with photography (not that I’m throwing stones!).  Along with him was his long suffering wife who described herself as his “Sherpa” because she got to lug around all of his gear.  When Ryan heard that, he playfully elbowed me in the ribs…. because he is my designated tripod-carrier on our hikes.

Anyway, we spent the next few hours taking our photos and quietly talking on the edge of the shore.  We watched the sky…and listened to the “Ewwws!” and “Ahhhs!” from the campers on the other side of the lake as meteors streaked across the heavens.

Lost in Space:  Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower at Lost Lake Oregon

“Ryan’s World”

 

I had two camera set up to automatically take continuous photos.    This ensured that I would capture nearly every meteor that flew over our heads.  It also gave me the chance to try my hand at making a time-lapse video.  The resulting ‘film’ condenses about 600 photographs down to less than 100 seconds, take a look:

In addition to the meteors, you can also see a number of aircraft and satellites in this video, but basically, anything that you see for less than a half of a second is likely to have been a meteor…and there were a bunch!    This is my first ‘real’ time-lapse and I’m still learning…but it was a lot of fun and I’m pretty happy with the result.

There weren’t a lot of meteors early in the evening, but they appeared with increasing frequency as the hours went by.  Just the same, of the 700+ frames I took over two days, there was only a single image that captured two at the same time:

Lost in Space:  Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower at Lost Lake Oregon

Twice as nice

Note how the meteors are multi-hued, plus they tend to be wider toward the center.  I learned that these attributes help you distinguish them from satellites or aircraft.

I really loved the way the Milky Way arched over the entire lake.  It was too wide a view to capture in a single shot so I stitched five frames to make a panorama:Lost in Space:  Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower at Lost Lake Oregon

Here is one last shot I’d like to share.  Basically, I took most of the decent sized meteors I photographed on Aug 12 and placed them on a single image.  I had to reorient some of them to take into account the rotation of the earth (since we saw the meteors over a 3 hour span of time).  It certainly makes for an interesting image:

Milky Way and Perseid Photography at Lost Lake Oregon

“Fusillade

By 1 am Ryan and I were yawning and since we planned to be hiking again in a few hours we thought it might be nice to get a bit of sleep first.  We said goodnight to our new friends and headed for our sleeping bags.

Over the next week or so, Ryan I spent time at a number of amazing places in the PAC NW, but our time at Lost Lake has become one of our favorite memories from the trip.   It kind of reminded us of one of those old-time fishing camps nestled way back in the woods. The area is truly beautiful, peaceful and seems to do wonders for your soul.

Plus, I got to have some NEW experiences.  Yeah, maybe I didn’t exactly squeal like a child, but it made me feel young just the same.

 

Jeff

PS:  If you go to Lost Lake, here is a map showing the spot we “found”:

Map for Photographing the Milky Way at Lost Lake Oregon

 

 

 Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower at Lost Lake Oregon

Photographing the Perseid Meteor Shower at Lost Lake Oregon

 

 

 

 

Also posted in Milky Way Photography, Night Photography, Pacific Northwest USA Tagged , , , |