Tag Archives: Pac NW photo locations

Inspiration Point: A “new” location for Photography at Mt. Rainier NP

If you are like me, you do a lot of research before travelling to a new location for photography.  Usually by the time I finish searching Google, Flickr and the local library, I have a comprehensive list of the ‘best’ spots.  Which is why I’m delighted when find a ‘new’ location.

Mt. Rainier has a long list of outstanding photo vistas:  the wildflower fields at Paradise, Myrtle Falls, Reflection Lakes, the view at Tipsoo Lake, etc.  Plus a lot of photographers have spilled gallons of ink about this wonderful National Park so I didn’t truly expect to find anything new.

I had been at Reflection Lake trying to get a sunset shot of Mt. Rainier, but the summit was clouded over (even though the rest of the sky was clear).  I finally decided to start heading back on Stevens Canyon road and try a spot I had seen earlier: Inspiration Point.

Inspiration Point: A "new" location for Photography at Mt. Rainier NP

This captivating view at Inspiration Point is what you see if you turn your back on Mt. Rainier and look to the east

Inspiration Point is an overlook with a large pull-out about a half mile before Stevens Canyon Rd ends at Paradise Valley Road.  The main attraction there is the magnificent in your face view of Mt. Rainier.  But when I had stopped there earlier, I had also noticed a pretty little valley you could see from southern end of the parking lot (see black and white photo).
The sun had already set when I got there and a large group of frustrated photographers were standing in a line on the northern edge of the parking lot trying to get a shot of Rainier which was still stubbornly lurking behind a bank of clouds.

Yup...that's Mt. Rainier hiding back there somewhere....

Yup…that’s Mt. Rainier hiding back there somewhere….

Then I glanced to the east and immediately forgot all about Rainier.

Inspiration Point: A "new" location for Photography at Mt. Rainier NP

Deja Vu” If you have ever been at Clingman’s Dome in the Smokies at sunset, then this view might be eerily familiar!

The view was mesmerizing.  I could have sworn I was standing at Clingman’s Dome in the Smokies:  Layers of overlapping blue mountains stretched out to the orange horizon.  I set up my tripod and got to work.

A few minutes later, the orange glow faded and the moon popped out.  I continued shooting for a while, then just sat down and enjoyed the view as the sky slowly darkened and the stars began their nightly show.

Inspiration Point: A "new" location for Photography at Mt. Rainier NP
As I drove back to my room, I thought about Inspiration Point and was more than a bit surprised:  It seemed to be a wonderful vista (obviously that’s how it got its name) but I couldn’t ever remember seeing a photo taken from here during my research.  On the other hand, who travels to Mt Rainier, stands right in front of it, then turns around and takes a photo in  the opposite direction?

 

Now, don’t get me wrong.  This will never be an iconic location.  I mean if you find yourself near Paradise and Rainier is visible, by all means head to one of the well known spots for your sunset shot.  But if the mountain is obscured by clouds, take a drive up to Inspiration Point, the view may not be famous but it is memorable nonetheless….plus you would have to drive another 2,500 miles to see a similar view at Clingman’s Dome!

 

 

Here is a map to show you the exact spot.

Mt. Rainier Photo Location

Hint: This location requires about a 100mm telephoto (on a full frame camera) to frame up the image.

Here’s to surprises and new vistas!

Jeff

 

 

Inspiration Point:  A “new” location for Photography at Mt. Rainier NP

New Mt. Rainier Photo Location

Posted in Pacific Northwest USA Also tagged |

New Gallery of my Pacific Northwest Favorites

Hello all,

Just wanted to let you know that I’ve just added a gallery of Pacific Northwest images to my portfolio. Check it out by clicking on this link!

2015 Northwest 06 24 656 blendskewskymerge

This image of 2nd Beach is one of my favorites in my new Pacific NW gallery..

 

Take care,

Jeff

Posted in Pacific Northwest USA Also tagged |

Tokatee Falls Photography: Guide, Tips and a Warning

Until recently, I had never had the chance to visit Oregon, but this year I’ve been there twice…and it has made quite an impression on me:

It is a beautiful state.

It is a diverse state.

But it is an also odd state, where the government thinks adults are intelligent enough to use marijuana responsibility but they don’t trust you to pump your own gas (seriously, they have a state law that requires gas stations to have an attendant to pump your fuel)….but then again, I live in Florida and perhaps I shouldn’t be calling other states odd.

As a photographer, Oregon’s big attraction is waterfalls.  They have tons of them.  And the ones they have are among the most photogenic in the country…if not the world.  Take a look at any Top Ten list of Beautiful Waterfalls and you will likely find at least a couple that are in Oregon.

Most folks like waterfalls, and others, like my son Ryan, absolutely love them.  So when Ryan and I planned our trip across the Pac NW earlier this year, he made sure that we included more than a few waterfalls.  The first we explored turned out to be one of our favorites of the trip: Toketee Falls.

Tokatee Falls Photography:  Guide, Tips and a Warning

The ‘classic’ view of Tokatee. An incredible sight.

Tokatee Falls is located in Central Oregon and isn’t as well known as the more publicized waterfalls in the Columbia River Valley.  But we had seen some photos on-line that got our attention and since it was only about 30 miles from Crater Lake National Park (where our trip had started) we decided to take a morning and check it out.

The name, Tokatee, is a native Chinook word meaning “pretty” or “graceful”…and it certainly is well named.  It is a beautiful, classical waterfall that drops 120 feet in two stages thru a wall carved from ancient columnar basalt.

Oddly enough, the thing that might have been the most memorable, wasn’t the waterfall.  Even before we got out of our car in the parking lot, this grabbed my attention:

This pipeline was built the same year of the Berlin Airlift, the year that Mao established Communist China, the year gas was 17cents per gallon….

This is a 12′ wide redwood aqueduct that diverts a good portion of a major river (the North Umpqua) to a hydroelectric plant.  What is really amazing is that it was built in 1949 and is still in use!  It runs right alongside the trailhead parking lot and as you get out of your car you will immediately notice the leaks. Since it holds a massive amount of water under high pressure those leaks become jets of water, some shooting over 15’…much to the delight of every child (and childlike adult).  Makes for a nice way to cool off on a hot day!  Check out my amateurish 15 second You Tube video if you want to see more:   https://youtu.be/kyc0MStQtpw

The half mile hike to the falls was easy…there is a bit of elevation change (200 steps) but it was shaded and the woods were beautiful.  At the end of the trail there is a new observation deck that has a killer view Toketee.

This is the same image you will see in 99% of the images on Google.  And with good reason…it is impressive.  Nearly all tourists and photographer snap a few shots here, then turn around and go back.  Which is exactly what I planned to do.  Except, when I finished my shots…Ryan was gone.  After a few confused minutes of looking around, I finally noticed him…all the way down at the base of the falls.   Since I knew his mother would never let me rest peacefully if I returned without him, I strapped the tripod to my back and started looking for the way down.  Mistake.  There is no way down.  At least not an official one and the only “path” was what locals call “a scramble.”  What I would call it is not printable.  Let’s just say it is little more than a slippery, controlled fall down a steep muddy slope.  After a couple minutes that voice in the back of my head started whispering:  “This is stupid…You are going to get hurt…You are smarter than this!!!”  But I’m really not that smart…plus my fear of my wife is a heck of lot louder than that silly little voice. So off I went.

I managed to get down without injury…and without loosing control of my bladder (which was kind of a close thing a couple times).

From the base of the falls, after my jackhammering heart slowed down, I raised my head and took in the view.

Tokatee Falls Photography:  Guide, Tips and a Warning

Ryan enjoys a Killer View…as in “I nearly got my ‘Old Man’ killed getting to this view”

It was humbling.  Over the ages the waterfall has carved a deep gouge in the solid rock wall.  And below it blasted out a huge bowl in the basalt.  Standing at the bottom of this ‘bowl’ you are surrounded by tall columns of the volcanic rock that reflects and amplifies the sound of smashing water.  To say it is loud misses the point… more like you can feel your ribcage reverberating within your chest.   Truly visceral!

 

2015 PAC NW  08 09 0884_HDRAfter your ears adjust to the volume, your eyes start to take into account the scale of the place.  Rather than looking at the whole vista, examine this close-up of the wall next to the waterfall:

Tokatee Falls Photography:  Guide, Tips and a Warning

See that fully grown tree on the right?   Now you are starting to get an idea of how massive the columns of basalt are that make up the wall of this gorge!

Tokatee Falls Photography:  Guide, Tips and a Warning

This was a challenging shot from a technical perspective. I had to balance the wide dynamic range and also focus stack 5 different shots to keep things sharp throughout the image.

Ryan and I spent nearly an hour soaking in the view.  Not another soul made their way down to the base of the falls (clearly they had better sense than we did.)  Although we saw a lot more waterfalls over the next week, Tokatee was one of the most memorable.  It has a wonderful balance of size, power and pure aesthetic beauty.   I hope you get to visit and photograph this treasure in the future.

Just for the record.  Although I used humor when I wrote about getting to the base of the falls, I want to clearly state that I do NOT recommend that you try to do so.  The ‘trail’ is not safe in its current condition. I have no doubt that someone will be seriously injured (or worse) trying to reach the falls.  I wish that the powers-that-be would invest the funds necessary to make an ‘official’ trail to the base, but that hasn’t happened yet.   Listen to that little voice in your head:  No photograph is worth serious injury.

Tips for my fellow photographers:

1)  When to visit?  Spring is the best.  Snowmelt makes for impressive volumes of water and everything is green.  However, most the shots in this blog were taken in June and as you can see, the water volume was still adequate and the vegetation vibrant.

2)  Be there in the morning so you can photograph the falls while in the shade.  The falls face west and as the day progresses, you will get direct sunlight on the face of the falls which makes photography more difficult.

3)  If you are shooting from the observation platform with a full frame camera, you will need about a 60mm lens to get a nice full image shot of the falls (about 40mm on a cropped APS-C sensor camera).  If you decide to shoot from the base (assuming you ignore my warning)  you will need a 27-40mm for most shots (15-20mm on crop sensor). There is a lot of spray at the base, bring some microfiber cloths to dry your lens between shots.

4)  You will need your tripod.  Since you will want to photograph while the falls are in the shade, you will need a tripod for longer exposure times, especially if you want the waterfall to have that ‘silky’ look.  My first shot in this blog, for example, was a 4 second exposure.  Most of the other shots were HDRs.

5)  Don’t forget your polarizer.  It will help reduce glare and make the colors ‘pop.’

6)  How to get there?  At milepost 58.6 on Highway 138 east of Roseburg Oregon, turn north on Road 34. Stay left at the Y and cross the bridge. A well-marked trailhead is 200 feet on the left.

7)  If you do go to the base of the falls, take a rope and a first aid kit.  Don’t go alone.  Leave an address for your next of kin on the dash of the car.

This is a beautiful location…enjoy!
Jeff

 

 

 Tokatee Falls Photography:  Guide, Tips and a Warning

Tokatee Falls Photography:  Guide, Tips and a Warning

Posted in Pacific Northwest USA Also tagged , |

10 Days: 10 Photos

This summer has been a busy, wild and intense ride!  In June I spent 20 days photographing Washington State and Southern Alaska.  Two weeks ago, my son, Ryan, and I hiked for 10 days during a 1,500 roadtrip thru the Pac NW and at Glacier NP.  And in two days, my wife and I head to Bonaire in the Caribbean for some underwater photography and scuba.  Needless to say, I am behind in my blog and it may take the rest of the year to catch up.

Today, I have only an hour or so free before I have to start packing, so I thought I would do a quick recap of the highlights of the hiking tour Ryan and I enjoyed…so sit back and enjoy!

Neither my son or I had ever visited Crater Lake and it turned out to be far more impressive than either of us had anticipated.  On our first night there, I got what may be the best shot of the entire trip.  I had long wanted to photograph the Milky Way with Wizard Island and the lake in the background.  I found the famous, whitebark pine that precariously hangs over the edge of the crater and got some solid images before the cold got to me and I decided to pack it in near midnight.  Ryan, who had been warming up in the car, came over and we spontaneously decided to use him as a model for a last shot.  Just as I hit the shutter, a meteor lit up the sky right over his head and we simultaneously screamed “Did you see that?!!!” In my next breath I yelled “Don’t Move” hoping he could hold still for the 20 second exposure so his image wouldn’t be blurry.  Did he freeze?  Check it out…

2015-pac-nw-08-07-0214-merge-crop

“Starstruck” You do all the planning in the world but sometimes pure luck makes the shot!

 

After a couple days of exploring Crater, we headed for the Oregon coast.  Along the way we stopped at Toketee Falls.  The standard shot is from the observation deck…and it is an impressive view!

2015 PAC NW 08 09 0777

My son decided to scramble down to the base of the falls.  I followed him but soon had second thoughts when it became clear that the trail was not official, safe or sane.  More about that experience at a later date!

Thor’s Well is one of those attractions that photographers fantasize about.  It’s a collapsed cavern on the Oregon shore.  At high tide, the ocean literally pours thru the roof of the cave and it truly looks like the Pacific is draining into a massive well.  I had planned our trip to coincide with high tide and sunset…I was not disappointed!2015 PAC NW 08 09 1205crop

Our next three days were spent hiking the famous waterfalls in the Columbia Gorge.  Ryan loves waterfalls and he had a long, detailed list…and I think we hit every, last, single one of them.  Hiking up Oneonta Gorge was without doubt, our favorite…similar to the Virgin Narrows at Zion only shorter and much greener!

2015 PAC NW 08 12 2564

Our next stop was Palouse Falls in Washington State.  It was over 100 degrees F when we arrived and I chuckled to think I had left Florida trying to escape the heat of August!  We hiked down to the base of the falls (yes, it was a trend…Ryan was determined to see every waterfall from all possible perspectives).  Fortunately, it cooled off overnight so we didn’t bake in our tent.  In the morning, the sun apologized for its brutal behavior the day before by greeting us with an epic sunrise.2015 PAC NW 08 14 3763_HDRcrop

We wrapped up our trip with three days in Glacier National Park.  Although there were a number of active wildfires in the park, Glacier is huge so we just selected hikes in the areas that were unaffected.  I was a bit disappointed by the hazy skies but they did seem to intensive the color at sunrise and sunset.

"Morning Beacon"

“Morning Beacon”

 

Glacier is well known for its wildlife…and now I know why! Bears, Big Horn Sheep, Moose, Mountain Goats, Marmots, Bald Eagles…the variety was incredible.  Not only that, but when you are alpine hiking, some of these critters use the same trails you do…so they get close.

Didn't need a zoom for this shot!

Didn’t need a zoom for this shot!

2015 PAC NW 08 16 4896

This ram got so close I could have taken this shot with a camera phone…seriously thought he was going to head-bump me for a second or two!

We finished our trip with the long hike to Grinnell Glacier on our last day.  My 20 year old son was kind enough not to leave me behind as we climbed the trail.  But to tell the truth, after hiking 50 or so miles since the start of our roadtrip, I admit that I didn’t exactly sprint up the mountain.

In this shot, Ryan's exuberance and joy of life is pretty apparent...in my case, I'm just ecstatic that I didn't drop dead on the trail:)

In this shot, Ryan’s exuberance and joy of life is pretty apparent…in my case, my happiness is due to the fact that I didn’t drop dead on the trail:)

So there you have it:  10 Days summarized by 10 Photos!  I have much more to share with you about trip…some great stories…like the one where a Park Ranger gave me a breathalyzer test because my eyes looked weird (that’s what a 57 year old guy looks like after hiking for 10 days with 4 hours sleep per night!)

Anyway, I gotta run.  More to come later!

Jeff

 

Posted in Roadtrips Also tagged |

Palouse Photography Tips: A Guide for Visitors

The Palouse is a remote farming area in southeastern Washington state and western Idaho.  The endless softly rolling hills are home to vast wheat fields, scattered small towns and friendly folks.  It’s the type of place that evokes memories of the “Norman Rockwell” America we imagine it was long ago.

You’ve probably never heard of the Palouse…unless you are a wheat broker, a local resident or a landscape photographer.

Why landscape photographers?  Well, those hills I mentioned are blessed by a soft, flowing, nearly sensuous beauty when viewed thru a camera.  As a result, photographers from across the world flock there during the summer when the fields are covered by colorful waves of wheat.   Images of this area captivated me for years and I finally had the chance in June to experience it for myself.

And here’s what I found:

Palouse Photography Tips: A guide for visitors

“Whitman County Growers”

What do you think?  Unreal?  Surreal?  I’d never seen anything like it but for some odd reason when I first gazed upon the Palouse landscape, I was oddly reminded of a painting by Dali …

The Persistence of Memory.jpg

“Persistence of Memory” by Salvadore Dali

I thought Dali was Spanish but maybe he spent some time in western Washington before he started painting?

The Palouse seems to encourage random, strange thoughts like that…it just doesn’t seem real somehow.   It is all just so pretty…so green and the people are just so incredibly nice.  Boy, I thought the folks in my town were friendly …but the Palouse?  Have you ever had one of those road-workers that holds the “Slow/Stop” signs actually walk up to your car and start talking to you?  This happened to me twice in the Palouse.  If this occurred in some other parts of the country, I’d be rolling up my windows and frantically looking for a way to get away…but here it didn’t seem odd or threatening.  It quickly became clear that the locals just don’t seem to have the ‘shields’ that those of us from urban areas take for granted.

Palouse Photography Tips

I bet you could have seen this same scene in 1950….or even 1850. The Palouse seems to embody a classic rural ambiance of a day long gone.

Okay…okay…enough with my ramblings about how the Palouse made me feel.   What does it look like?

Well, first of all the landscape is best appreciated from the vantage point of height.  Fortunately, there is a tall hill (butte) smack dab in the middle of the best part of the Palouse.  It is called Steptoe Butte and as part of the Washington State Park system, it is open to the public.    In the hours before dusk and after dawn, the low angle of the sun creates wonderful shadows around all those curvy hills.

2015 Northwest 06 19 554 south pano

Seven frame panorama from the summit of Steptoe made right after sunrise…

Steptoe tops-out at 3612′ and you can park on the summit and see an absolutely unreal 360º vista.   Palouse Photography TipsWith a pair of binoculars you can see the occasional red barn, farm house or grain silo…but those are the exceptions.  Nearly everything you can see in every direction is just soft, curving hills covered with rippling waves of grain.

Well, you will also notice the 58 turbines of the Palouse Wind Farm built in 2012.  They are a good distance north of the butte so they don’t look huge but they are actually about 500′ tall and produce quite a bit of electricity.

 

Palouse Photography Tips

Unplanted areas contrast the lush green crops

Every direction you look reveals more details and different perspectives:

Palouse Photography Tips

This is the famous ‘Red Barn.’ Look for it when you are on the summit. I bet it has been photographed thousands of times…

If you come down from the Butte, the perspectives from ground level are still captivating…just not jaw dropping.

Palouse Photography Tips

One very lonely and very dead tree.

So, if you ever want to travel back in time to a simpler, friendlier time while being surrounded in a landscape that only a crazy Catalonian surrealist artist could envision, make your way to the Palouse next summer.  It will be a memorable experience.

Tips and suggestions for my Fellow Photographers:

When to Visit?

May and June are usually peak for the yellow and green of the fields.  A very different look can be seen in July and August when the wheat turns gold and brown. Harvesting usually begins in late August.

Where to stay?

Colfax is the town closest to Steptoe.  It is about 30 minutes south and you can choose from 4 or 5 hotel/motels.

Where should you go for your shots?

Steptoe Butte  As mentioned, Steptoe Butte is the primo place to be in the Palouse.

Palouse Photography Tips

Steptoe sticks out of the surrounding landscape like a sore toe (sorry…had to say it)

The best light is near sunrise and sunset.  Be on Steptoe for both….the same features can look totally different at the opposite ends of the day.  Plus, by visiting twice you will increase your chances of photographing during partly cloudy conditions when dappled sunlight accentuates the incredible shadows created by the low angled sunlight.

When you first get to Steptoe, pay your $10 at the unattended kiosk (or you can buy a full year pass online for $30), then drive to the summit. There is a large parking area just below the actual summit and many folks pull in here mistakenly thinking they are at the top.  The actual summit is accessed by a narrow (a little wider than a single car), unmarked road on your left as you pull into the larger pullout.  It looks like a service road used to get to the cell towers on the summit.  Once you get to the top, scout out your potential shots by using your binoculars.  Look for nice perspectives and find the farm houses, barns and silos that you will want to incorporate into your shots.

Palouse Photography Tips

Front Row Seating for Steptoe Summit Sunrise

Don’t stay at the summit the whole time.  There are a number of pullouts along the road that winds around the butte and they will give you significantly different perspectives.  It only takes a few minutes to drive from one to the other and you will be surprised how different your shots look from the lower elevations.

The park is officially open from dawn to dusk but I’ve never had an issue being there earlier or later than the posted hours.

Palouse Photography Tips

Some fields are planted with brilliant yellow canola stretching as far as your eye can see…

During the day, drive around:  Get off the paved roads, slow down and just drive.  There are some wonderful vignettes to be found.  Be respectful of private property and be aware that some big farm equipment rolls down the gravel roads.  Also be aware that most of the roads around here have sharp drop-offs right at their edge….you can’t just pull over everywhere.  You may have to drive a bit further and hike back a short ways.

Palouse Photography Tips

The famous “Wagon Wheel” fence

Dahmen Barn:  Located in Uniontown (about an hour south of Steptoe) this is an antique barn that is now a co-op for local artists.  Photographers adore the fence that surrounds the property which is made from hundreds of old metal tractor wheels, gears, etc.  Here is a link with more info and directions.

Palouse Photography Tips

Not your typical barn

T.A. Leonard Barn:  You will see a lot of quaint red barns in the Palouse, but how many round barns have you ever seen?  This beautifully restored gem is 40 minutes south of Steptoe in Pullman right off of Old Moscow Road.  It’s a private farm and not open for tours but you can photograph it from the road.  This site will give you more info and directions.

Kamiak Butte:    Actually a bit taller than Steptoe but you can’t drive to the summit. 2015 Northwest 06 20 904 There is a hiking trail to the top (about 3.5 miles roundtrip).  If you are visiting for more than a day and you have already got all the shots you want from Steptoe, then it is certainly worth a visit but if your time is limited, Steptoe is the place to be. Great place for a picnic lunch.  Kamiak is about 29 miles (55 minutes) from Steptoe.  Click this link for more info.

Palouse Falls:  About an 90 mile drive west of Steptoe is the magnificent 197′  Palouse Falls.  Perhaps best seen at sunset, you can also take wonderful Milky Way shots here.  I’ll be writing a full article about this location later in the fall.

Other locations:  A local photographer has put together a detailed map  showing locations of barns, old cars and other photographic points of interest.  She sells the map via the internet for $25.  It is quite detailed and worth your money if you are going to visit.  Here is a link.  And no, I don’t get a commission!   Short of hiring a full time local guide, this is the best resource I’ve found to help visiting photographers find potential locations

How long should you visit?

If your time is tight, you can cover the highlights in a day.  That will give you a sunrise and sunset on Steptoe and the middle of the day to explore the countryside.  Of course, the Palouse is a big area, so you would need to spend much longer to cover it thoroughly.  If you do decide to take a few days, I’d suggest you hire one of the local photo guides or book a photo tour.  Many of them have relationships with the farmers who will allow you to access to locations on private property that would otherwise be unavailable to you.

Equipment?

Lenses: When you think of landscapes, you naturally think of wide angle lenses and they will come in handy when you are driving around the farm roads.   But on Steptoe, you need long lenses.  As I reviewed my photos taken on the butte, I noticed that nearly all of them were taken somewhere between 300-500mm on a full frame camera (450mm to 750mm on an APS-C crop sensor camera).

Polarizer:  You will often have some haze on Steptoe and a polarizer will help reduce that issue and make your colors ‘pop.’

Tripod:  The Palouse can be a bit breezy.  On Steptoe, the wind can really rip.  I have a heavy duty tripod and head that had never, ever had a problem even with my monster 200-400 beast of a zoom lens.  At least it never had a problem until I was on Steptoe.  As I checked my shots in the LCD, I noticed that some of them were not quite as sharp as others…the wind was shaking my rig ever so slightly.  I’d suggest you weigh down your tripod, take 2 or 3 shots of every scene and check every single shot fully zoomed in to ensure that your shots are sharp.Palouse Photography Tips

Post processing

Dynamic Range:  Full frame cameras, HDR, blending layers in Photoshop….many of us work hard to show the full dynamic range in our shots.  Oddly enough, the Palouse is one of those venues where that might not be necessary..or even preferred.  Those dark shadows contrasted by the brilliant crests of the hills seems to me to be a big part of the beauty of the Palouse.  Do yourself a favor and try processing some shots where you can’t see every detail in the shadows…you might like the result.

Haze:  I found that I had to use the clarity slider in Photoshop liberally to combat this issue.

That should be enough to get you started on a successful photo trip to the Palouse.  I’m sure you will enjoy yourself and feel free to email me with copies of your best images!
JeffPalouse Photography Tips

Palouse Photography Tips:  A Guide for Visitors

 

Posted in Pacific Northwest USA, Photo Tips and Guides Also tagged , , |